Empathy (Older Group) FREE ACCESS

An important aspect of socio-emotional development is empathy. Empathy is demonstrated when a person feels concern and/or wants to assist someone who may need support. When you understand and share in another person’s experiences and feelings, you are able to develop strong bonds and develop meaningful relationships with other people. During this topic, students will work on identifying/understanding situations where empathy is appropriately expressed. Students will also practice their own expressions of empathy. This topic is suggested to be targeted for three weeks. Below, you will find a suggested sequence to follow.

Step 1 : Discussion Video "Quiz"

Students and clinician view the video titled, “Quiz”.  After viewing this video, the clinician and student engage in discussion about the importance of having a social mind, reading people’s faces and having a big heart, with questions. Questions may include, “Did anything go wrong? What went right? What went wrong? What could have been done instead?”

Students and clinician view the second video titled, “Quiz/correct version” After viewing this video, the clinician and student engage in discussion about the importance of having a social mind, reading people’s faces and having a big heart,   with questions. Questions may include, “Did anything go wrong? What went right? How?”

Step 2: Visual Bombardment Video (#1)

Next, students will be visually bombarded with facial expressions that depict empathetic reactions. For example, faces may be disappointed or supportive. It is important we are able to read each other’s faces in order to offer verbal support as well as offer support in our facial expressions.

NEW! Tell Me What I'm Thinking (Exercise 1)

Practice perspective taking skills. Students are asked to pretend to be the actor and say what they’re thinking. For example, seeing a video of a girl who is sad, students say, “I’m so sad  because I miss my  friend”. 

Step 3: Selfie or Mirror Time

Now it is time to practice facial expressions. Using a camera, smartphone, and/or mirror, have students practice how they would show empathy by being supportive to someone who is disappointed. Focus in on eyebrow movement and the corners of the mouth. Take selfies with the student and show how you would demonstrate empathy.

Step 4: Practice Videos and Role-Playing

Students and clinician view a practice videos titled, “Condolences” and “Try Outs”.  After viewing these practice videos, the clinician and student will engage in discussion with questions. First, we focus on the interpretation of emotions. Next, we focus on how to support these emotions (i.e., supportive look or comments). Questions may include, “What could you do to offer support? What went right? What went wrong? What could have been done instead? Let’s role play this scenario correctly.”

Note: It can be very helpful to video tape students when role playing and then have students watch and rate themselves.

Condolences

Try Outs

Week 2

Step 1: Visual Bombardment Video (#2)

Review Concepts:  Week two begins with a review of the previously learned concepts. Big heart, social mind, and empathy will be discussed.

Visual Bombardment 2:  Next, students will be visually bombarded again with facial expressions that depict empathetic reactions. This time, the faces may depict the following emotions: in pain, nervous, excited. Discuss with students what makes each face appear to depict each emotion (i.e., eye brows, mouth, expression).

Step 2: Vocal Inflections Video

Students will watch a video on vocal inflections. The clinician and student will discuss how inflection can change the entire meaning of a phrase or sentence and it is important to use correct inflection in order to socially communicate with our peers. The video explains upward and downward inflection. For example, when pitch goes from low to high, this may indicate questioning, excitement, surprise, or insincerity. When there is a downward inflection, the pitch goes from high to low and may indicate empathy, certainty, or confidence. After watching the video, students will practice vocal inflection. You may wish to show students that when different words are inflected in a sentence, it changes the meaning of the sentence. Additionally, there are some suggested upward and downward inflection phrases for your student to try. Feel free to add some of your own!

Step 3: Selfie Time

It is time to practice facial expressions again! Using your camera, smartphone, and/or mirror, have students practice how they would show empathy to someone who is in pain, nervous and excited. Have the student practice their own facial expression that depicts “nervous, in pain and excited.” Practice vocal inflections that go along with your facial expressions as well!

Step 4: Practice Videos and Role Playing

Students and clinician will view three additional practice videos titled, “Quiz”, “Foreign Food” and “Bad Day”. After viewing each practice video, the clinician and student will engage in discussion with questions. First, the clinician and student should focus on the interpretation of the emotions seen in the videos. Second, the focus changes to how to support these emotions (i.e., supportive look or comments). Questions may include, “How would you support a friend who failed a quiz?  In the videos – What went right? What went wrong? What could have been done instead? Let’s role play this scenario correctly.

Quiz

Foreign Food

Bad Day

Week 3

Step 1: Visual Bombardment Video (#3)

Review Concepts: Week three begins with a review of the previously learned concepts. The clinician and student will review the following emotions: nervous, worried, excited, ashamed, and proud.  

Visual Bombardment 3: Next, students will be visually bombarded again with facial expressions that depict empathetic reactions. This time, the faces depict the following emotions: embarrassed and proud. Discuss with students what makes each face appear to depict each emotion (i.e., eye brows, mouth, expression). 

New: Digital Worksheet Now Available

Step 2: Vocal Inflections Video

Vocal Inflections Video: Students will watch the video on vocal inflections again. Review with students why inflection is so important when we speak. Go through examples and practice.

Step 3: Selfie Time

Selfie Time: It is time to practice facial expressions again! Using your camera, smartphone, and/or mirror, have students practice how they would show empathy to someone who is embarrassed and proud.

Step 4: Practice Videos and Role Playing

Practice Videos and Role-Playing: Students and clinician will view three additional practice videos titled, “T-Low” and “Neighbor”. After viewing each practice video, the clinician and student will engage in discussion with questions. First, the clinician and student should focus on the interpretation of the emotions seen in the videos. Second, the focus should change to how to support these emotions (i.e., supportive look or comments). Questions may include, “Why is it important to support peers’ interests and accept others interests? If you felt sad or in pain, what would you expect someone’s reaction to look like? What went right in this video? What went wrong? What could have been done instead? Let’s role play this scenario correctly.”

T-Low

Neighbor

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